If your leads are not converting, you might want to look at this one part of your approach.

One of the difficulties a lot of my clients go through is how to frame out their services in a way that other people understand them.

After all, a confused buyer is one that does not buy.

Butchers, for instance, have both hamburger meat and prime meat; you don’t want to give up the client who is having a large barbecue because you only advertise that you have prime.

You can’t be everything to everyone; but……

What I’ve found is that you can speak to different market niches if you have select service lines or offerings that serve those niches.  “The barbecue counter” and the “wine with dinner” counter for instance.

That way, the customer doesn’t have to know a lot about meat to know where they should start asking about options.  No need to say “can you tell me if porterhouse is good enough for a kids are away date night.”  It’s predetermined, and the conversation can be deeper, quicker:  would you do smaller porterhouse on a grill or thicker filet?”

If you segment the messaging for different markets, you give the customer control of context.  This allows them to make meaningful decisions about what is best for them, and ask the best questions for their situations.

“How can I help you” is a very different question if the customer is in context to information or isn’t.

And, if you have packaged products thoughtfully “this is our barbecue platter for 5, for 10, for 15” it makes it easier for the customer to just say “yes” knowing that you’ve solved all the details.

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